Margaret Atwood Net Worth In 2023: Why Fraudster Enters A Guilty Plea?

Margaret Atwood Net Worth: The full name of Margaret Atwood is Margaret Eleanor Atwood; she was born in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, on November 18, 1939. Margaret Atwood is a Canadian author best recognized for her prose fiction and feminist viewpoint. Atwood split her time as a teenager between Toronto, where her family lived most of the time, and the sparsely populated bushland in northern Canada, where her father, an entomologist, did research.

She started writing when she was five years old and picked it again up ten years later, more seriously. After finishing her undergraduate studies at Victoria College at the University of Toronto, Atwood went on to Radcliffe College in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where she graduated in 1962 with a master’s degree in English literature.

If you want to get the net worth of Margaret Atwood, Hurry Up!

Margaret Atwood Net Worth

The estimated net worth of Margaret Atwood is $20 million. She is a famous Canadian poet, writer, and essayist who has written a variety of books, including “The Handmaid’s Tale,” “Cat’s Eye,” and “Oryx and Crake.” Her work as a poet, writer, literary critic, essayist, teacher, and inventor generated the majority of her income.

Award-winning poems, short stories, and novels by Canadian author Margaret Atwood include The Circle Game (1966), The Handmaid’s Tale (1985), The Blind Assassin (2000), Oryx and Crake (2003), and The Tentmaker (2005). Her writings have been adapted for the big screen and translated into many other languages; in 2017, miniseries versions of The Handmaid’s Tale and Alias Grace were produced.

Subtract all of Margaret Atwood’s debts from her total assets to get her net worth. The total assets comprise her investments, savings, cash deposits, and any equity she may have in a home, automobile, or another comparable item. Total liabilities encompass all obligations, including credit card debt and school loans.

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A Fraudster Enters A Guilty Plea In The Phishing Scheme That Deceived Writers Margaret Atwood

A con artist admitted guilt to a scheme that involved defrauding a number of authors by tricking them into turning over hundreds of unpublished manuscripts in a New York courtroom on Friday, capping a years-long tale that embroiled the publishing industry. An Italian national named Filippo Bernardini who worked in publishing in London admitted guilty to one count of wire fraud in connection with a phishing scam that confounded the book industry for years.

Damian Williams, the US attorney for the Southern District of New York, made the news and stated that Bernardini would be sentenced on April 5 before US District Judge Colleen McMahon. Williams stated in a statement that “Filippo Bernardini utilized his insider knowledge of the publishing industry to establish a scam that stole priceless works from writers and threatened the publishing industry.”

A Fraudster Enters A Guilty Plea In The Phishing Scheme That Deceived Writers Margaret Atwood
A Fraudster Enters A Guilty Plea In The Phishing Scheme That Deceived Writers Margaret Atwood

Bernardini, 30, allegedly utilized email accounts to pose as literary agents and editors in order to defraud authors of their submissions. Williams said that Bernardini fraudulently acquired more than a thousand manuscripts using impersonation and phishing methods. The maximum term for Bernardini, who has not publicly disclosed his motivations, is 20 years in jail.

In exchange for his guilty plea, he agreed to make an $88,000 restitution payment. According to the authorities, the scam ran from roughly August 2016 until his arrest in January 2017.

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Man Admits Attempt To Scam Margaret Atwood And Sally Rooney Authors

A mystery that has roiled the literary community for years was finally solved when an Italian man confessed on Friday to stealing more than 1,000 unpublished manuscripts, including some belonging to renowned authors. Federal prosecutors in New York released a statement announcing that Filippo Bernardini, 30, had entered a plea to one count of wire fraud.

Man Admits Attempt To Scam Margaret Atwood And Sally Rooney Authors
Man Admits Attempt To Scam Margaret Atwood And Sally Rooney Authors

Bernardini, a London-based employee of the publisher Simon & Schuster, used email impersonation to pretend to be agents and publishers in order to get books and other works from authors and their agents. The swindle has purportedly targeted writers including Margaret Atwood, Ian McEwan, and Sally Rooney for several years, according to literary circles. When FBI agents detained Bernardini at JFK Airport in New York in January of last year, it became well known.

The Italian began impersonating hundreds of actual persons in the publishing industry in August 2016 and continued doing so up until his arrest by sending emails from fictitious accounts. The addresses resembled the domain names of trustworthy publications, with the occasional letter modified. He registered more than 160 bogus domains, according to the prosecution.

“Filippo Bernardini devised a scheme that threatened the publishing business and stole priceless works from writers using his insider knowledge of the publishing industry, “US Attorney for the Southern District of New York, Damian Williams, said (SDNY). Atwood’s representative confirmed in 2019 that the “The Testaments” manuscript “had been picked out.

According to a 2021 article in New York Magazine, the Swedish editors of Stieg Larsson’s “Millennium “series were contacted by a supposed Italian colleague who asked for an advance copy so that it may be translated before publication. The end of the year 2020 saw a New York Times investigation uncovering the targeting of “Normal People” author Rooney, “Atonement” author McEwan, and actor Ethan Hawke. It has never been obvious what Bernardini wanted.

Man Admits Attempt To Scam Margaret Atwood And Sally Rooney Authors
Man Admits Attempt To Scam Margaret Atwood And Sally Rooney Authors

The lack of requests for payment or evidence that the works had ever been posted online or on the dark web perplexed the alleged victims. Soon after his arrest, screenshots of Bernardini’s LinkedIn page identified him as a “rights coordinator.” “during Simon & Schuster. Due to his “obsession for the written word and languages,” according to his biography, he earned a bachelor’s degree in the Chinese language in Milan and a master’s degree in publishing from UCL in London.”

At the time, Simon & Schuster, which was cleared of any misconduct, stated that it was “shocked and dismayed” to hear the accusations.” “Simon & Schuster’s first concern is to protect writers’ intellectual property “Publisher released a statement on Friday. “We appreciate the FBI and Department of Justice’s protection and support of writers’ worldwide intellectual property rights, “It was stated.

Bernardini first asserted his innocence. According to the SDNY, as part of his guilty plea, he agreed to make an $88,000 restitution payment. The maximum punishment for his offense is 20 years in jail. On April 5, Bernardini will be sentenced in federal court in Manhattan. Don’t forget to share this news with your loved ones, and check out Talkxbox.

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