iPhone 14 Screen Shock Revealed in New Apple Leak

07/24 Update is provided here. This post was first published on July 21.

Several iPhone 14 rumors indicate that Apple’s upcoming entry-level iPhone will be nearly identical to its predecessor. However, momentum is building around one unexpected development that has the potential to overtake competitors.

In an interview with me, acknowledged industry display specialist Ross Young, CEO of Display Supply Chain Consultants (DSCC), stated that Samsung’s ‘M12 OLED material set’ display technology will be available on all iPhone 14 versions. This is surprising given that it did not even make it into Samsung’s flagship Galaxy S22 Ultra.

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The rumor also adds to an earlier report from The Elec that said Apple was considering the M12. But no one anticipated it to be employed in every iPhone 14 model, and I would have been skeptical if it hadn’t been for Young’s impressive track record.

So, what is M12? It essentially consists of the dopant, host, and prime elements of the red, green, and blue pixels of OLED displays. M12 improves display performance, color accuracy, and energy economy. Given that displays are one of the most significant battery drains in a smartphone, this latter function is critical. Especially with rumors stating iPhone 14 battery capacities will be identical to the iPhone 13 line-up.

07/23 Update: More information on the iPhone 14 range’s production has surfaced. In a tweet thread, influential TF International Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo revealed that Apple has added a new supplier to help with the industry’s widespread chip shortages.

SG Micro has “passed the quality certification of the higher-end iPhone 14 and will likely ship the PMICs (battery and level shifter) for the iPhone 14 in 2H22,” according to Kuo.

One of the key discussion points surrounding the iPhone 14 lineup is battery capacity. While the iPhone 14, iPhone 14 Max, and iPhone 14 Pro are all expected to get minor upgrades, the iPhone 14 Pro Max battery is expected to be smaller than its predecessor.

Power efficiency has become a selling point for Apple hardware in recent years, so it will be interesting to watch how this is handled in the iPhone 14 lineup, and the addition of SG Micro appears to be well timed.

07/24 Update: Ross Young has supplied additional information about the iPhone 14 lineup’s use of M12, and it’s not all good.

iPhone 14 Screen Shock Revealed in New Apple Leak (1)
iPhone 14 Screen Shock Revealed in New Apple Leak (1)

While M12 will boost the power efficiency of iPhone 14 displays over their predecessors, he clarified that this does not guarantee they would be class-leading in other aspects. “The S22 Ultra will almost certainly be brighter because of the MLA/MLP structure, which increased brightness to 1750 nits.” “But it should be better than the iPhone 13,” he said.

This is reasonable. For reference, the iPhone 13 and iPhone 13 Pro have peak brightness ratings of 800 and 1000 nits, respectively, so the generational leap would have had to be tremendous. Furthermore, Apple has never been interested in winning a spec war, so it stands to reason that the corporation would prefer efficiency over all else.

Young also provided context for Samsung’s omission of the M12 in the Galaxy S22 lineup, stating that the “timing didn’t work out.” M12 is just getting started.” So it appears that Apple will benefit from Samsung’s loss — at least until the Galaxy S23 lineup is released early next year.

So, why didn’t Samsung include this technology in the Galaxy S22 lineup? It all came down to cost-cutting, according to The Elec. However, some Galaxy fans may find this difficult to accept given that the Galaxy S22 Ultra costs nearly twice as much as an iPhone 14.

07/23 Update: More information on the iPhone 14 range’s production has surfaced. In a tweet thread, influential TF International Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo stated that Apple had added a new supplier to help with the industry’s frequent processor shortages.

SG Micro has “passed the quality certification of the higher-end iPhone 14 and will likely ship the PMICs (battery and level shifter) for the iPhone 14 in 2H22,” according to Kuo.

One of the key discussion points surrounding the iPhone 14 lineup is battery capacity. While the iPhone 14, iPhone 14 Max, and iPhone 14 Pro are all expected to see minor upgrades, the iPhone 14 Pro Max battery is expected to be smaller than its predecessor.

Read More:

Power efficiency has become a selling point for Apple hardware in recent years, so it will be interesting to watch how this is handled in the iPhone 14 lineup, and the addition of SG Micro appears to be well timed.

07/24 Update: Ross Young has supplied additional information about the iPhone 14 lineup’s use of M12, and it’s not all good.

While M12 will boost the power efficiency of iPhone 14 displays over their predecessors, he clarified that this does not guarantee they would be class-leading in other aspects. “The S22 Ultra will almost certainly be brighter because of the MLA/MLP construction, which increased brightness to 1750 nits.” “But it should be better than the iPhone 13,” he said.

This is reasonable. For reference, the iPhone 13 and iPhone 13 Pro have peak brightness ratings of 800 and 1000 nits, respectively, so the generational leap would have had to be tremendous. Furthermore, Apple has never been interested in winning a spec war, so it stands to reason that the corporation would prefer efficiency over all else.

Young also provided a reason for Samsung’s absence of the M12 in the Galaxy S22 lineup, stating that the “timing didn’t work out.” M12 is only getting started.” So it appears that Apple will benefit from Samsung’s loss – at least until the Galaxy S23 series is released early next year.

So, why didn’t Samsung include this technology in the Galaxy S22 lineup? It all came down to cost-cutting, according to The Elec. However, some Galaxy fans may find this difficult to accept given that the Galaxy S22 Ultra costs nearly twice as much as an iPhone 14.

As a result, the Galaxy S22 Ultra and Galaxy S22 Plus employ M11 (the same as models from 2021), while the normal Galaxy S22 uses M10, a generation first used by the Galaxy S20 line in 2020.

Yes, iPhone 14 pricing is expected to rise across the board, but Apple devotees will point to all the small details that the company continues to nail with its handsets. And this appears to be another one.